1.11.2010

DAVID MAISEL: Library Of Dust

Photograph (c) David Maisel /All Rights Reserved

Photograph (c) David Maisel /All Rights Reserved

Photograph (c) David Maisel /All Rights Reserved

. . . these canisters hold the cremated remains of patients from an American psychiatric hospital. Oddly reminiscent of bullet casings, the canisters are literal gravesites. Reacting with their ash inhabitants, the canisters are now blooming with secondary minerals, articulating new metallic landscapes.” — Geoff Manaugh, Contemporary

16 comments:

mar-abunta said...

Qué maravilla!

kyungmee said...

OMG! I love this series..first..how crazy and amazing is that? Wild. Furthermore, brilliant for the artist/photographer to work with this kind of imagery and idea..I personally always loved metals and of metalic things that we keep with nature..fascinating subject..sorry so long. Very nice post!

Russ Martin said...

The statement accompanying the photographs is brilliant and does indeed stimulate one to consider the meaning of life. It is only upon reading the statement that the photographs can be truly appreciated. Together, they remind one of the statement the priest tells every Catholic on Ash Wednesday, "Remember Man that Thou Art Dust and To Dust Thou Shall Return".

Hyper-Minor said...

pretty damn cool

Four Seasons in a Life said...

This is something else.

At first glance one cannot help to be drawn into the chemical reaction, Then as ones eyes begin to read the words, only to discover that they contain human remains, shock takes over for a moment.

Once it subsides, I am overcome by the possibilities that after death I/we may yet paint my/our surroundings with the very essence of your remains.

Thank you for sharing, as this was certainly a jewel of a find,
Egmont

Susan said...

Extraordinary!

Lulu LaBonne said...

these are so beautiful and intriguing

Sandra Darling ~ Visual Art Creations said...

OMG these are absolutely divine!!! How the imagination runs wild thinking about the people and the little coloured metalic landscapes they are making.

Ange said...

I remember escaping into the hills behind our house when I was little in NZ to a favourite hiding spot. Open pipelines came out of the hillside - just big enough for a child to fit in. I would sit there for hours scraping the pretty coloured 'bacteria' off the walls and putting it into cannisters - pretending I was a scientist. I got a bit of a shock looking at these - the colours are much the same as I remember from that pipeline... were there ashes in there further into the shadows? I don't know...

Caio Fernandes said...

i didn't resist and went to look for more about him .... his work is great ...

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

Wow, very very intriguing.

Nezzy said...

WoW! How awesome is this? Thanks for sharing this very interesting art form.

Have a terrific day ya'll!!!

little augury said...

A fascinating project. One post I have returned to and the site as well. Such a complex and mysterious series. I have thought about it for days. Thanks, EA for finding these photographers and introducing them to the public at large. GT

The Browns said...

how amazing! and beautiful colors...

david@davidmaisel.com said...

Thanks for this post, Elizabeth. I hope that you (and your blog's readers) can make it over to the Von Lintel Gallery to see the "Library of Dust" exhibit that opens this Thursday evening, January 21st, from 6-8 PM.

Cheers,
David

kombizz said...

not sure what should I say about the hospital who kept these ashes
kombizz