6.09.2010

KEVIN J. MIYAZAKI: 567 Photography Interviews

from Camp Home
A series
on former Japanese-American Internment Barracks
Photograph (c)Kevin Mitazaki /All Rights Reserved

from Camp Home
A series
on former Japanese-American Internment Barracks
Photograph (c)Kevin Mitazaki /All Rights Reserved

from Camp Home
A series
on former Japanese-American Internment Barracks
Photograph (c)Kevin Mitazaki /All Rights Reserved

from Camp Home
A series
on former Japanese-American Internment Barracks
Photograph (c)Kevin Mitazaki /All Rights Reserved

from Camp Home
A series
on former Japanese-American Internment Barracks
Photograph (c)Kevin Mitazaki /All Rights Reserved

from Camp Home
A series
on former Japanese-American Internment Barracks
Photograph (c)Kevin Mitazaki /All Rights Reserved

Photographer and part-time educator, Kevin Miyazaki, has created THE BIG LIST [567 & GROWING] OF PHOTOGRAPHER AND PHOTO INDUSTRY INTERVIEWS on MIAD-FA382. It's a fantastic Resource - a must-see-and-read for anyone interested in Photography!

You can read HOME: KNOWN AND UNKNOWN by curator Karin Higa, Japanese American National Museum, about Miyazaki's series Camp Home (on his website under Personal/Camp Home). He has been documenting the reuse of buildings from the * Tule Lake Internment Camp, where his father's family was placed during World War II. Because photography was forbidden by internees, very few photographs of the home-life were made by the families. "My pictures act as evidence, though many years later, of a domestication rarely recorded during the initial life of the structures."

Kevin Miyazaki: Website
The Big List: MIAD-FA382


* Tule Lake was the largest and most controversial of the ten War Relocation Authority WRA camps used to carry out the government’s system of exclusion and detention of persons of Japanese descent, mandated by Executive Order 9066. Two-thirds of the 120,000 persons of Japanese descent incarcerated in American concentration camps were American citizens, an act that culminated decades of anti-Japanese violence, discrimination and propaganda. Read more...

9 comments:

UIFPW08 said...

Beautifull shots..
Morris

Nicholas Vreeland said...

I really like Kevin Miyazaki's pix

Caio Fernandes said...

oh my !! these photos are so good !!
here in Brazil had camps for the japanese imigrants during the 2nd war too . but i don't know about any photography registre .

i didn't know these photos were fron a camp till start to read the post .
they are exellent by itself .

i really want to link to the "THE BIG LIST " site .
thank you .

Tammie Lee said...

i love the soft shades of color.

Chapa said...

Great choice!

Bruce Barone said...

I am reminded of Eknath Easwaran’s Thought for the Day June 8:

"All that is sweet, delightful, and amiable in this world, in the serenity of the air, the fineness of seasons, the joy of light, the melody of sounds, the beauty of colors, the fragrancy of smells, the splendor of precious stones, is nothing else but Heaven breaking through the veil of this world, manifesting itself in such a degree and darting forth in such variety so much of its own nature."
– William Law

These stunning yet simple, zen-like images, illustrate, for me, the power of beauty breaking through, wanting to break through, breaking through the ordinary. Domestication as beauty.

If we didn't know whose photographs these were and where they were taken, we might presume they were out-takes possibly from Joel Meyerowitz's "A Summer's Day."

And the Resource; WOW!

Also, EVERYONE ought to read his About/Bio!!!

Arti said...

The photos are amazing!
Great work..

d. moll, l.ac. said...

Images and concept are top notch, love it!

Anonymous said...

Which Japanese American internment camp were these taken? I didn't know there were any standing.
Lily