2.20.2011

STEPHEN MALLON: The Next Stop Atlantic

Photograph (c) Stephen Mallon/All Rights Reserved

Photograph (c) Stephen Mallon/All Rights Reserved

Photograph (c) Stephen Mallon/All Rights Reserved

Kathleen Vance, Associate Director, Front Room Gallery, in front of Stephen Mallon's "Next Stop Atlantic" image

Photograph (c) Stephen Mallon/All Rights Reserved

Photograph (c) Stephen Mallon/All Rights Reserved

UPDATE!
"Next Stop Atlantic"
Visual Arts Center of New Jersey
July 29 - September 25, 2011
68 Elm Street, Summit, NJ

NYC Transit joined the artificial reef building program off the east coast of the U.S. in 2000, sending stripped subway cars on barges to be dropped into the Atlantic Ocean to build refuge for fish and crustaceans to colonize the structures. Photographer Stephen Mallon beautifully traces the progress of the train cars on their last voyage out to sea.

Mallon gained enormous acclaim for his series, "Brace For Impact: The Salvage of Flight 1549," documenting the salvage of the U.S. Airways flight piloted by Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, who managed to emergency-land in the Hudson River in January 15, 2009 without losing any passenger lives.

Another Mallon Must See: Stephen Mallon produced and directed this video created from over 30,000 still images, posted in The Wall Street Journal: A New York Bridge Delivered (here). Follow the progress of this massive structure as it is floated, dragged, pushed and pulled over one hundred miles of New York's historic waterways.

UPDATE!
"Next Stop Atlantic"
Visual Arts Center of New Jersey
July 29 - September 25, 2011
68 Elm Street, Summit, NJ


4 comments:

Caio Fern said...

fishes and coral are going to have a new home now !
before to read I had only seen the first photo and thought it was pictures of the last storms in Brazil :D

Kristin Hjellegjerde said...

Stunning and strong photos!

meera said...

wonderful record of start of reef building! --good to know my first impression was not the right one :)

minimodi said...

hmm, now I got a dreamy picture in my head of fishes swiming around in subway cars on the bottom of the sea... considering the deapth and darkness down there that picture becomes more eerie and creepy... Didn't know they could do that in the first place...